Right Turn: Health care solutions on demand through 3D printing

Author: Stacey Johnson, 04/21/17

3D printing is a topic we’ve covered before at Signals. It’s still hot and trendy, and still making the cut on top technology lists. Back in 2012, Chris Anderson, the former editor-in-chief of Wired, predicted that 3D printing “will be bigger than the web.” Given that good 3D printers are now cheap enough (US$150) to…Read more

Major League Baseball Pitchers and “Stem Cell” therapy

Author: David Kent, 04/18/17

With the Toronto Blue Jays* off to a terrible start, I was almost dissuaded from reading anything about baseball, until I happened upon the following article: “Stem-cell therapy is poised to disrupt the Tommy John epidemic in baseball.” First, I had to do my standard “fake news” check by triangulating the sources, readings, etc., but…Read more

Right Turn: Sightings of innovation in Canada

Author: Stacey Johnson, 04/14/17

If you are a knowledge worker, it may seem as though “innovation” is on everyone’s lips these days. First, Canadians saw Industry Canada renamed Innovation, Science and Economic Development when Prime Minister Trudeau unveiled his first cabinet. Then, Budget 2017, titled “building a strong middle class” could have had “the innovation budget” as its working…Read more

Enabling technologies are helping regenerative medicine to succeed

Author: Stacey Johnson, 04/11/17

Earlier this year, the University of Toronto’s Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering (IBBME) published its Annual Report, chock full of impressive numbers about enrolment, new programs and research published by its esteemed faculty. (If you’re curious, you can read it for yourself.) In response, I summarized the regenerative medicine research here. But I only…Read more

Right Turn: Best summer jobs for science students

Author: Stacey Johnson, 04/07/17

Remember back in 2013 when Tourism Australia launched the “Best jobs in the world” global youth campaign? Well, the Waag Society in Amsterdam may just have the “coolest science summer job” around! (Yes, Waag Society, you can quote me on this.) The Waag Society, an “institute for art, science and technology,” needs a science bus…Read more

The curious case of applying electric shock to treat brain injuries

Author: Hamideh Emrani, 04/04/17

The month of March is a time for celebrating women around the world. As a science enthusiast, I have been so inspired by the women I see succeeding in the research field. Since I started writing for this blog, I have had the chance to write about and interview female researchers such as Jin Hyung…Read more

Right Turn: The robots aren’t coming, they’re here

Author: Stacey Johnson, 03/31/17

via GIPHY Artificial Intelligence (AI) already permeates our culture and that’s only going to increase with time and advances to the technology. Some think this is good news, progress and inevitable while others, like Stephen Hawking for example, fear where AI could take us. AI is on my mind this week with the announcement that…Read more

The long slog of medical R&D and finding inspiration

Author: Elizabeth Csaszar, 03/27/17

Research and development (R&D) of a medical therapeutic is a long slog. This isn’t news to anyone working in the field. The average time to bring a new drug product to market is over a decade. Moreover, this is the timeline when everything progresses well – funding and business decisions align, manufacturing processes come together,…Read more

Right Turn: Stem cell researchers develop more than undifferentiated stem cells at StemCellTalks Toronto

Author: Erin Sugar, 03/24/17

The eighth annual Toronto StemCellTalks (SCT) symposium took place on March 10, 2017, in Toronto’s urban innovation hub (and CCRM’s new home), MaRS Discovery District. SCT is a national stem cell biology outreach program for high school students in partnership with Let’s Talk Science and the Stem Cell Network. (CCRM is also a proud national…Read more

From organ survival to organ revival – how patients can regenerate their own donor lung prior to surgery

Author: Holly Wobma, 03/22/17

For most areas of medicine, the supply of a treatment can easily meet demand (access issues aside). Need an antibody? A steroid? Millions of pills are manufactured every day. The case could not be more different for solid organ transplantation, for which the list of patients with end-stage organ failure vastly exceeds the number of…Read more