Samantha Payne

Samantha is a PhD student in the Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry department at the University of Toronto. She has previously investigated regeneration in a non-mammalian gecko model during an MSc program, and now currently combines stem cell biology and biomaterials to encapsulate and deliver therapeutic cells to the stroke-injured brain. Samantha became interested in scientific communication as a means to combine her love of writing and science to share exciting scientific discoveries to a broader community. Follow Samantha on Twitter @samantha_lpayne

Posts by: Samantha


Wave of the future: Using anesthesia to detect neurodegeneration

Author: Samantha Payne, 01/03/17

Most people have experienced being put to sleep for a surgical procedure, whether it is relatively minor like the removal of a tooth, or major heart surgery. In fact, every day 60 000 people will undergo general anesthesia in the U.S. You may have noticed a lot of stories sound similar: “I was completely awake…Read more

Ada Lovelace Day: celebrating women in STEM

Author: Samantha Payne, 10/11/16

Can you name five historically influential women in the STEM fields (science, technology, engineering and medicine)? What about three? I recently asked myself this question and found that I struggled to come up with names, despite the formal training I’ve received in science at both the undergraduate and graduate level. Yet there are many: from…Read more

Highlights from the World Biomaterials Congress Part II: Stepping up delivery strategies

Author: Samantha Payne, 06/20/16

This post is the second of two covering the World Biomaterials Congress. To read my previous blog about the use of biomaterials to study cell behaviour and differentiation in vitro, please click here. This post will cover the use of biomaterials for in vivo delivery strategies. Cartilage, despite its essential role in the movement of…Read more

Highlights from the World Biomaterials Congress Part I: The push and pull of cell behaviour

Author: Samantha Payne, 06/07/16

The World Biomaterials Congress (WBC), which takes place once every four years, happened last month. Among the many excellent presentations at WBC, two themes related to cell-based therapies stood out: 1) the use of biomaterials to study cell behaviour and differentiation in vitro, which I will discuss here, and 2) the use of biomaterials to…Read more

A double duty scaffold for cell delivery to the brain

Author: Samantha Payne, 04/07/16

Neurodegenerative diseases of the brain, such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s, are a leading cause of disability in Canada, but despite the significant burden on patients, caregivers and the health-care system, we still lack a cure. An active area of research for these diseases is focused on the transplantation of exogenous cells to replace degenerated neurons…Read more