Archive for the ‘clinical translation’ Category

Can we use animals as living incubators for human tissue?

Author: Jovana Drinjakovic, 01/16/17

Markus Grompe certainly thinks so and is working hard to make it happen. A scientist and a pediatrician specializing in inborn liver diseases, Dr. Grompe has a plan for overcoming the shortage of organ donors—the key obstacle for patients for whom the liver transplant is the only hope. Based at the Oregon Health and Science…Read more

A credit card sized lab

Author: Hamideh Emrani, 12/29/16

Professor Aaron Wheeler earned his PhD from Stanford University and, after a two-year postdoc fellowship at UCLA, joined the faculty of Chemistry at the University of Toronto. He has won numerous awards and honours for his work in the field of microfluidics and is the associate editor of Lab on a Chip. Wheeler’s lab develops…Read more

Right Turn: These three videos show why we should be impressed by our young stem cell researchers

Author: Lisa Willemse, 11/18/16

Stroke, lung damage and mathematical modeling. You may not think these three topics have much in common and for the most part you’d be right. But they have more than one common link. First, each is either a disease focus or methodology within stem cell research. Secondly, each subject –biomaterials to aid stem cell engraftment…Read more

Insights from CGTW16 – Part 1: Cell Manufacturing Best Practices

Author: Guest, 11/17/16

Amin Adibi is a biomedical engineer and a research assistant at the University of British Columbia. His areas of interest include cell manufacturing and bioprocess optimization, clinical translation of cellular therapies, health outcomes and cost-effectiveness modelling. Amin has an MSc degree from University of Calgary, where he focused on developing adjuvant MSC-based therapies for brain…Read more

A peek into a septic shock clinical trial and a patient’s message of hope (TMM2016-Day2)

Author: Hamideh Emrani, 10/27/16

The second day of the Till & McCulloch Meetings (TMM) kicked off with a great talk by Dr. Masayo Takahashi of the Riken Center for Developmental Biology, on the generation of retinal progeny and photoreceptors from iPSCs and ESCs. However, for today, I would like to focus on two different talks. I am sure further…Read more

Rewarding Excellence – Awardees at TMM2016

Author: Camila Londono, 10/26/16

The feature session of the fifth Till & McCulloch Meetings shone a light on two fantastic researchers, Huijuan Yang and Molly Shoichet, both of whom received awards for their outstanding work. Huijuan Yang, a PhD student in the Nagy lab at the Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute at Mount Sinai hospital in Toronto, received the inaugural Drew…Read more

Stem cell regulatory networks, dynamics and ways to engineer them (Day 1, TMM2016)

Author: Hamideh Emrani, 10/25/16

This year’s Till & McCulloch Meetings (TMM2016) began with a diverse set of topics organized into three different plenary sessions. The first session, on regulatory networks in stem cells, began with Sara-Jane Dunn from Microsoft Research who introduced us to “The Reasoning Engine for Interaction Networks, RE:IN,” a computational tool that can synthesize and analyze…Read more

Sculpted to a T: Synthetic T-cells for a more controlled immune response

Author: Holly Wobma, 10/18/16

I have a confession.  This is not a blog about stem cells. It is, however, a blog about cells with infinite possibilities of fate. Because we are entering the world of synthetic biology, where crafty cellular engineering has enabled a new level of control over immune cell function. This work comes out of Wendell Lim’s…Read more

A new style of MSC immunotherapy – Instructions included

Author: Holly Wobma, 09/22/16

If you have been following stem cell news lately, you know that there have been several recent Food and Drug Administration (FDA) meetings regarding how to classify stem cells, which ultimately affects if and how they will be regulated. There are many medical practitioners, scientists, and patients who would like to see these therapies on…Read more

The story of the first bone marrow transplant

Author: Jovana Drinjakovic, 09/15/16

It was a failed transplant that saved his life. In 1958, Radojko Maksic became the first person to receive a bone marrow graft from a stranger, after he was accidentally exposed to a lethal dose of radiation in Belgrade, in what was then Yugoslavia. He still lives in Belgrade, almost 60 years after the procedure….Read more