Archive for the ‘Right Turn’ Category

Right Turn: A 2017 resolution you can commit to

Author: Stacey Johnson, 01/13/17

Join a gym. Lose weight. Quit smoking. Save more money. I bet you know what these have in common: Yes, they are popular (and quickly broken) New Year’s resolutions. Although quitting gambling also fits nicely into this list, I’m willing to put up money that “make a stem cell resolution” has never crossed your mind….Read more

Right Turn: A PhD in stand-up comedy

Author: Stacey Johnson, 01/06/17

“Biology is the only science in which multiplication is the same thing as division.” “Q: What did the conservative biologist say? A: The only cleavage I want to see is at the cellular level.” “Q: What did one cell say to his sister cell when she stepped on his toe? A. Mitosis”* Hunh? I’ve literally…Read more

Right Turn: My favourite things (blogs!)

Author: Stacey Johnson, 12/30/16

  Raindrops on roses and whiskers on kittens, Bright copper kettles and warm woolen mittens, Brown paper packages tied up with strings, Blogs are a few of my favourite things. When the dog bites, When the bee stings, When I’m feeling sad, I simply remember my favourite blogs and then I don’t feel so bad….Read more

Right Turn: Rare sighting of Macareindeer captured on video before holidays

Author: Stacey Johnson, 12/23/16

Our story begins in a wondrous land called Torona, far from the North Pole, where mythical creatures – half human, half reindeer – have dedicated their adult years to the admirable pursuit of helping to treat patients around the world with “regenerative medicines,” whether they’ve been naughty or nice. When they aren’t busy with their…Read more

Right Turn: The elements of a great story (courtesy of OIRM’s SciComms Workshop)

Author: Laine Jaremey, 12/16/16

I joined graduate students and early-career researchers at OIRM’s first Science Communications Workshop, held November 24, 2016 in Toronto. Expert communicators from a variety of backgrounds provided a valuable introduction to the essentials of successful science communication at the day-long event. We learned that storytelling is a tool that can help you to construct compelling…Read more

Right Turn: WSCS has something for everyone, under the Florida sun

Author: Stacey Johnson, 12/09/16

Have you been to the World Stem Cell Summit before? This meeting bills itself as the “original, translation-focused global meeting of stakeholders” that brings together leading scientists and clinicians, investors, customers, legal experts, funders, regulators and patients in the regenerative medicine field. And it’s all true. It’s a four-day cornucopia featuring 90 hours of programming…Read more

Right Turn: Every damn swan – a note on the scientific hypothesis

Author: Guest, 12/02/16

Malgosia Pakulska is a research associate in the Shoichet lab at the University of Toronto and a science writer for Research2Reality, a blog designed to engage the public in Canadian research. Malgosia wants to educate, entertain, and show people what science is really like, one story at a time. When she is not in the lab,…Read more

Right Turn: A proliferating list of popular podcasts

Author: Stacey Johnson, 11/25/16

Podcasts have been around since the 1980s and with 250,000 unique podcasts in more than 100 languages, according to Apple, you can probably find one that covers any topic you care to search for. Back in 2014, Lisa Willemse encouraged Signals’ readers to tune in to The Stem Cell Podcast and I mentioned them last…Read more

Right Turn: These three videos show why we should be impressed by our young stem cell researchers

Author: Lisa Willemse, 11/18/16

Stroke, lung damage and mathematical modeling. You may not think these three topics have much in common and for the most part you’d be right. But they have more than one common link. First, each is either a disease focus or methodology within stem cell research. Secondly, each subject –biomaterials to aid stem cell engraftment…Read more

Right Turn: What do the results of the U.S. election mean for science?

Author: Stacey Johnson, 11/09/16

This isn’t the blog that I planned to write this week, but I’m so preoccupied with the outcome of the U.S. election, I’m finding it hard to focus on anything else right now. So, let’s look at the implications of a Trump presidency on science. An article in Nature quotes Michael Lubell, director of public…Read more