Archive for the ‘Science Communications’ Category

The “immunity saboteurs ” – otherwise known as T-cells

Author: Hamideh Emrani, 06/07/17

Did you know that a healthy person with a healthy lifestyle and diet might still end up being diabetic? That is certainly the case with those who have type 1 diabetes (T1D). In T1D, the patient’s body has lost the ability to produce insulin. Insulin is a hormone that acts like an agent and takes…Read more

The roots of regeneration

Author: Samantha Payne, 05/24/17

The study of how organisms evolved and diversified, called phylogeny (phylo = race or kind and gene = origin), may bring up memories of sitting in biology class looking at elaborate tree-shaped diagrams and incomprehensible latin labels. But there is so much more to it. If we take a closer look, it becomes clear that phylogenetics can be…Read more

Right Turn: FFB is funding and keeping an eye on vision research

Author: Stacey Johnson, 05/19/17

Dr. Mary Sunderland is quite at ease talking to a video camera. The Director of Research & Education for the Foundation Fighting Blindness (FFB) has been hosting Facebook Live sessions on a variety of topics related to vision research for the past six months. If she was nervous when she began these public outreach sessions…Read more

Guardian of the genome goes rogue in cultured stem cells

Author: Jovana Drinjakovic, 05/10/17

Last month, a study published in Nature revealed that researchers have unknowingly been working on human stem cell lines that harbour mutations in a gene linked to many cancers, raising safety concerns over their use in therapy. But the findings don’t condemn stem cell treatment to an early grave. Instead, they raise an awareness of…Read more

Right Turn: Lessons about science communications from a six-year-old podcaster

Author: Laine Jaremey, 04/28/17

What were you doing when you were six years old? When I was six, I was building forts with couch cushions and playing with toys. A six-year-old named Nate from Illinois, USA, achieves much more in his free time than I did when I was a child. Nate started his own podcast called “The Show…Read more

Enabling technologies are helping regenerative medicine to succeed

Author: Stacey Johnson, 04/11/17

Earlier this year, the University of Toronto’s Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering (IBBME) published its Annual Report, chock full of impressive numbers about enrolment, new programs and research published by its esteemed faculty. (If you’re curious, you can read it for yourself.) In response, I summarized the regenerative medicine research here. But I only…Read more

Right Turn: Best summer jobs for science students

Author: Stacey Johnson, 04/07/17

Remember back in 2013 when Tourism Australia launched the “Best jobs in the world” global youth campaign? Well, the Waag Society in Amsterdam may just have the “coolest science summer job” around! (Yes, Waag Society, you can quote me on this.) The Waag Society, an “institute for art, science and technology,” needs a science bus…Read more

The curious case of applying electric shock to treat brain injuries

Author: Hamideh Emrani, 04/04/17

The month of March is a time for celebrating women around the world. As a science enthusiast, I have been so inspired by the women I see succeeding in the research field. Since I started writing for this blog, I have had the chance to write about and interview female researchers such as Jin Hyung…Read more

Right Turn: The robots aren’t coming, they’re here

Author: Stacey Johnson, 03/31/17

via GIPHY Artificial Intelligence (AI) already permeates our culture and that’s only going to increase with time and advances to the technology. Some think this is good news, progress and inevitable while others, like Stephen Hawking for example, fear where AI could take us. AI is on my mind this week with the announcement that…Read more

Right Turn: Stem cell researchers develop more than undifferentiated stem cells at StemCellTalks Toronto

Author: Erin Sugar, 03/24/17

The eighth annual Toronto StemCellTalks (SCT) symposium took place on March 10, 2017, in Toronto’s urban innovation hub (and CCRM’s new home), MaRS Discovery District. SCT is a national stem cell biology outreach program for high school students in partnership with Let’s Talk Science and the Stem Cell Network. (CCRM is also a proud national…Read more