Archive for the ‘Science Communications’ Category

Can we use animals as living incubators for human tissue?

Author: Jovana Drinjakovic, 01/16/17

Markus Grompe certainly thinks so and is working hard to make it happen. A scientist and a pediatrician specializing in inborn liver diseases, Dr. Grompe has a plan for overcoming the shortage of organ donors—the key obstacle for patients for whom the liver transplant is the only hope. Based at the Oregon Health and Science…Read more

Right Turn: A PhD in stand-up comedy

Author: Stacey Johnson, 01/06/17

“Biology is the only science in which multiplication is the same thing as division.” “Q: What did the conservative biologist say? A: The only cleavage I want to see is at the cellular level.” “Q: What did one cell say to his sister cell when she stepped on his toe? A. Mitosis”* Hunh? I’ve literally…Read more

Wave of the future: Using anesthesia to detect neurodegeneration

Author: Samantha Payne, 01/03/17

Most people have experienced being put to sleep for a surgical procedure, whether it is relatively minor like the removal of a tooth, or major heart surgery. In fact, every day 60 000 people will undergo general anesthesia in the U.S. You may have noticed a lot of stories sound similar: “I was completely awake…Read more

Right Turn: My favourite things (blogs!)

Author: Stacey Johnson, 12/30/16

  Raindrops on roses and whiskers on kittens, Bright copper kettles and warm woolen mittens, Brown paper packages tied up with strings, Blogs are a few of my favourite things. When the dog bites, When the bee stings, When I’m feeling sad, I simply remember my favourite blogs and then I don’t feel so bad….Read more

A credit card sized lab

Author: Hamideh Emrani, 12/29/16

Professor Aaron Wheeler earned his PhD from Stanford University and, after a two-year postdoc fellowship at UCLA, joined the faculty of Chemistry at the University of Toronto. He has won numerous awards and honours for his work in the field of microfluidics and is the associate editor of Lab on a Chip. Wheeler’s lab develops…Read more

Right Turn: The elements of a great story (courtesy of OIRM’s SciComms Workshop)

Author: Laine Jaremey, 12/16/16

I joined graduate students and early-career researchers at OIRM’s first Science Communications Workshop, held November 24, 2016 in Toronto. Expert communicators from a variety of backgrounds provided a valuable introduction to the essentials of successful science communication at the day-long event. We learned that storytelling is a tool that can help you to construct compelling…Read more

Understanding how to hone your story for media – Tips from an expert

Author: Laine Jaremey, 12/13/16

Last month, the Ontario Institute for Regenerative Medicine (OIRM) hosted its first Science Communications Workshop. Expert speakers, who included journalists, communicators and social media specialists, educated the mostly graduate students and early-career researchers in attendance by helping them navigate media interviews and communicate their work using social media. In this post, I’m sharing learnings from…Read more

Crazy for CRISPR!

Author: Sara M. Nolte, 12/05/16

On November 15th, my social media pages exploded with posts and comments regarding the latest news about how the gene-editing ‘CRISPR-Cas9’ technology had been used in the first human patient. The article, published by Nature, was entitled “CRISPR gene-editing tested in a person for the first time.” It described how a group of Chinese scientists…Read more

Right Turn: Every damn swan – a note on the scientific hypothesis

Author: Guest, 12/02/16

Malgosia Pakulska is a research associate in the Shoichet lab at the University of Toronto and a science writer for Research2Reality, a blog designed to engage the public in Canadian research. Malgosia wants to educate, entertain, and show people what science is really like, one story at a time. When she is not in the lab,…Read more

Right Turn: A proliferating list of popular podcasts

Author: Stacey Johnson, 11/25/16

Podcasts have been around since the 1980s and with 250,000 unique podcasts in more than 100 languages, according to Apple, you can probably find one that covers any topic you care to search for. Back in 2014, Lisa Willemse encouraged Signals’ readers to tune in to The Stem Cell Podcast and I mentioned them last…Read more