New York loves stem cells

Author: Lisa Willemse, 11/15/11


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Art shows are not exactly routine activities for those who work in research, let alone in the field of stem cells. So when an art exhibit that examines our perceptions of biotechnology and stem cell research opens in New York, it’s something of an occasion. Even more so if New York embraces the show right back, which certainly appeared to be the case of the crowd in attendance, as well as some of the other activities planned around the exhibit.

We’ve blogged about the Perceptions of Promise exhibit before – the inaugurual exhibit in Calgary early in 2011 garnered a fair bit of attention from critics and the popular press, but the show’s presence at the Chelsea Art Museum (running until November 19) somehow underscores the importance of this endeavour.

MillssmMaybe it’s because having a show in a trendy New York gallery is a proud achievment for any artist. Maybe it’s that all-too-Canadian need to be recognized outside our own country. I’d like to think it has more to do with the importance of the topic itself, which we have so often seen can be polarized and clouded with hype as well as legal, political, economic and religious overtones.

Ingram_smPersonally — and I’m not alone in this sentiment — I think there needs to be more thoughtful and informed discsussion about biotechnology in atypical locations — not in labs, but in coffee joints, at dinner parties, on the street, in schools. And if shows such as this one help achieve this, by asking people to think about what it means to them and to stimulate interest and greater understanding, so much the better.

Read full news release.

Images all from Perceptions of Promise at the Chelsea Art Museum, NY. Top artwork by Sean Caulfield, centre by Royden Mills, bottom by Liz Ingram and Bernd Hildebrandt

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Lisa Willemse

Lisa Willemse

Lisa is a science communicator with 15+ years' experience in the fields of regenerative medicine, child development and technology. She launched this blog (first as the Stem Cell Network Blog) in 2009, and served as co-editor until April 2015. She is currently the Senior Communications Advisor for the Ontario Institute for Regenerative Medicine and has recently contributed to Motherboard, Science Borealis and the Genome Alberta and Canadian Blood Services blogs. Follow her on Twitter and Medium @WillemseLA.
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