Right Turn: My favourite things (blogs!)

Author: Stacey Johnson, 12/30/16

  Raindrops on roses and whiskers on kittens, Bright copper kettles and warm woolen mittens, Brown paper packages tied up with strings, Blogs are a few of my favourite things. When the dog bites, When the bee stings, When I’m feeling sad, I simply remember my favourite blogs and then I don’t feel so bad….Read more

A credit card sized lab

Author: Hamideh Emrani, 12/29/16

Professor Aaron Wheeler earned his PhD from Stanford University and, after a two-year postdoc fellowship at UCLA, joined the faculty of Chemistry at the University of Toronto. He has won numerous awards and honours for his work in the field of microfluidics and is the associate editor of Lab on a Chip. Wheeler’s lab develops…Read more

Right Turn: Rare sighting of Macareindeer captured on video before holidays

Author: Stacey Johnson, 12/23/16

Our story begins in a wondrous land called Torona, far from the North Pole, where mythical creatures – half human, half reindeer – have dedicated their adult years to the admirable pursuit of helping to treat patients around the world with “regenerative medicines,” whether they’ve been naughty or nice. When they aren’t busy with their…Read more

Inaugural Medicine by Design Symposium – Engineering progress in regenerative medicine

Author: Nicole Forgione, 12/21/16

On November 28 local and international leaders of the regenerative medicine (RM) community gathered at the MaRS Centre in Toronto for the first ever Medicine by Design (MbD) Symposium. The event marked the first year of the MbD program at the University of Toronto (U of T). This initiative was established based on a $114…Read more

Right Turn: The elements of a great story (courtesy of OIRM’s SciComms Workshop)

Author: Laine Jaremey, 12/16/16

I joined graduate students and early-career researchers at OIRM’s first Science Communications Workshop, held November 24, 2016 in Toronto. Expert communicators from a variety of backgrounds provided a valuable introduction to the essentials of successful science communication at the day-long event. We learned that storytelling is a tool that can help you to construct compelling…Read more

Understanding how to hone your story for media – Tips from an expert

Author: Laine Jaremey, 12/13/16

Last month, the Ontario Institute for Regenerative Medicine (OIRM) hosted its first Science Communications Workshop. Expert speakers, who included journalists, communicators and social media specialists, educated the mostly graduate students and early-career researchers in attendance by helping them navigate media interviews and communicate their work using social media. In this post, I’m sharing learnings from…Read more

Right Turn: WSCS has something for everyone, under the Florida sun

Author: Stacey Johnson, 12/09/16

Have you been to the World Stem Cell Summit before? This meeting bills itself as the “original, translation-focused global meeting of stakeholders” that brings together leading scientists and clinicians, investors, customers, legal experts, funders, regulators and patients in the regenerative medicine field. And it’s all true. It’s a four-day cornucopia featuring 90 hours of programming…Read more

Crazy for CRISPR!

Author: Sara M. Nolte, 12/05/16

On November 15th, my social media pages exploded with posts and comments regarding the latest news about how the gene-editing ‘CRISPR-Cas9’ technology had been used in the first human patient. The article, published by Nature, was entitled “CRISPR gene-editing tested in a person for the first time.” It described how a group of Chinese scientists…Read more

Right Turn: Every damn swan – a note on the scientific hypothesis

Author: Guest, 12/02/16

Malgosia Pakulska is a research associate in the Shoichet lab at the University of Toronto and a science writer for Research2Reality, a blog designed to engage the public in Canadian research. Malgosia wants to educate, entertain, and show people what science is really like, one story at a time. When she is not in the lab,…Read more

Insights from CGTW16 – Part 3: Clinical trials, health economics and regulatory affairs

Author: Guest, 12/01/16

Amin Adibi is a biomedical engineer and a research assistant at the University of British Columbia. His areas of interest include cell manufacturing and bioprocess optimization, clinical translation of cellular therapies, health outcomes and cost-effectiveness modelling. Amin has an MSc degree from University of Calgary, where he focused on developing adjuvant MSC-based therapies for brain…Read more