Right Turn: Like a kid’s science show, but for grownups

Author: Stacey Johnson, 09/05/14

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Jordan Green, a biomedical engineer from Johns Hopkins, has a way with words. And toys. He’s like a Mister Rogers (American) or Mr. Dressup (Canadian) for adults. He has a complicated idea to convey, so borrowing from the best children’s entertainers around, he uses colourful props that perfectly suit his friendly demeanor. Dr. Green’s lab is exploring ways to treat brain cancers and he has narrowed in on nanoparticles that can program cancer cells to self-destruct without harming the healthy cells.

To demonstrate his premise, he reaches into his “toy box” – his words! – to pull out dominoes and balloons. Black dominoes represent normal cells, white dominoes represent mutated cells and balloons stand in for cells that change their colour and shape following gene therapy. All that his video is missing are some friendly puppets to bounce ideas off of. His explanation is so clear, I bet a kid would understand it. I did.

 

Our regular feature, Right Turn, showcases the “lighter” side of stem cells and regenerative medicine. Every Friday, we will bring you cartoons, photos, videos and other content that may be just as thought provoking as the written submissions that you are used to finding here, but they definitely won’t be blogs.

As always, we welcome your feedback and we also welcome suitable submissions. Be creative! Use the right (!) side of your brain. Make us laugh! Let’s see if we can make this new direction a positive one for all of us. Send your submission to info(at)ccrm.ca.

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Stacey Johnson

Stacey Johnson

For almost 20 years, Stacey has been providing strategic communications counsel to government, corporate, technology and health organizations. Prior to that, Stacey was at the CTV Television Network, first as a researcher, then as a story producer for “Goldhawk Fights Back,” a special ombudsman segment that aired weekly on the National News and Canada AM. Before joining CCRM as the Director, Communications and Marketing, Stacey was the Director of Communications for the Canadian Arthritis Network. Stacey is editor of Signals. You can follow Stacey on Twitter @msstaceyerin.
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