Posts Tagged ‘iPSCs’

Right Turn: These three videos show why we should be impressed by our young stem cell researchers

Author: Lisa Willemse, 11/18/16

Stroke, lung damage and mathematical modeling. You may not think these three topics have much in common and for the most part you’d be right. But they have more than one common link. First, each is either a disease focus or methodology within stem cell research. Secondly, each subject –biomaterials to aid stem cell engraftment…Read more

A complete (re)program to recognize the 10-year anniversary of iPSCs

Author: Stacey Johnson, 08/25/16

Ten years ago today, Japanese scientists Shinya Yamanaka and Kazutoshi Takahashi published a paper announcing the creation of rodent induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, thus pioneering the field of iPS cell technology. They showed that they could convert adult cells into pluripotent stem cells – in other words, they reprogrammed them to look and function…Read more

iPS cell technology – kickstarting our ability to control cell identity

Author: Holly Wobma, 08/25/16

When you hear the word “stem cell,” I imagine this conjures up the image of cells that are special. Unlike most cells, stem cells can differentiate into other cell types. They hold the promise of curing many diseases, and thus they are continually the source of hype in mainstream and social media. Yet the above…Read more

Steady progress and more interesting science – 10 years of iPS cells

Author: David Kent, 08/25/16

One of the most memorable moments of my young scientist career was a Keystone Conference in February 2006 in Whistler, BC where I first heard Professor Shinya Yamanaka describe the successful reprogramming of a skin cell into an induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC). I’ve written about this moment on Signals before and taken on the…Read more

Blog carnival update: Topic and bloggers revealed!

Author: Stacey Johnson, 08/18/16

In case you missed it: Signals is hosting its first “blog carnival” on August 25, 2016. What is that you ask? Think of a blog carnival as a single venue hosting a variety of entertainment. In this case, the “entertainment” are posts from influential bloggers across the stem cell research community all blogging on the…Read more

Right Turn: Could this rhino-sized rescue plan really work?

Author: Alanna Evans, 06/17/16

Peanut butter and jelly. Macaroni and cheese. Fish and chips. Some things are just better paired together. But there’s one combination you’d never expect to see: surrogate rhinos and stem cells.    With just three northern white rhinos left on earth, it looks like this unlikely duo may soon become a reality. An international team…Read more

Ugly duckling spreads its wings

Author: Jovana Drinjakovic, 06/13/16

  When Dr. Andras Nagy, a Senior Scientist at Sinai Health System’s Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute in Toronto, set out to catalogue molecular events behind reprogramming — a process of making stem cells in a dish ­— he did not expect to uncover a new kind of stem cell. But not everyone was enchanted, and Nagy…Read more

A double duty scaffold for cell delivery to the brain

Author: Samantha Payne, 04/07/16

Neurodegenerative diseases of the brain, such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s, are a leading cause of disability in Canada, but despite the significant burden on patients, caregivers and the health-care system, we still lack a cure. An active area of research for these diseases is focused on the transplantation of exogenous cells to replace degenerated neurons…Read more

An interview with bioengineering pioneer Kevin Healy

Author: Hamideh Emrani, 01/05/16

In the fourth in her series on “What drives research in the field of biomaterials?” blogger Hamideh Emrani interviews Professor Kevin E. Healy at the University of California, Berkeley. You can catch up on Hamideh’s earlier interviews here. I met Professor Kevin Healy at the University of California, Berkeley. He is the Jan Fandrianto Distinguished…Read more

The waiting game: First human iPSC clinical trial on hold

Author: Guest, 09/01/15

. Nicole Forgione is a post-doctoral fellow working in the Fehlings group at the Toronto Western Research Institute. Currently she holds a Toronto Western Research Institute Fellowship to support her work on cell-based regenerative therapies for traumatic spinal cord injury. Nicole earned her BA from Wilfrid Laurier University, where she studied English Literature and Biology….Read more