Posts Tagged ‘science communications’

Right Turn: Lessons about science communications from a six-year-old podcaster

Author: Laine Jaremey, 04/28/17

What were you doing when you were six years old? When I was six, I was building forts with couch cushions and playing with toys. A six-year-old named Nate from Illinois, USA, achieves much more in his free time than I did when I was a child. Nate started his own podcast called “The Show…Read more

Right Turn: Stem cells, like children, are a labour of love

Author: Stacey Johnson, 03/17/17

For many Canadians with kids, we’re nearing the end of March Break – a holiday from school for elementary- and secondary school-aged children. Whether you’re travelling or at home this week, you’ve spent lots of quality time with your children and this new video from a group at Cambridge may really resonate with you. According…Read more

Right Turn: My question to Paul Knoepfler: Do you ever sleep?

Author: Stacey Johnson, 03/10/17

Paul Knoepfler, already well known for his prolific blogging at The Niche and for his role as a stem cell educator and tireless patient advocate – award winning no less – has taken on another project. Ask him a question about stem cells and you may get a live response. On February 26th, Dr. Knoepfler,…Read more

Right Turn: Checking in on Research2Reality

Author: Stacey Johnson, 02/17/17

Research2Reality will soon be celebrating its 2nd anniversary. I first wrote about it when it launched and was excited by its mission to highlight the work of scientists across Canada, from a variety of disciplines, and make their research interesting and understandable to a non-expert audience. Through videos and blogs, Research2Reality is “shining a light…Read more

Right Turn: My favourite things (blogs!)

Author: Stacey Johnson, 12/30/16

  Raindrops on roses and whiskers on kittens, Bright copper kettles and warm woolen mittens, Brown paper packages tied up with strings, Blogs are a few of my favourite things. When the dog bites, When the bee stings, When I’m feeling sad, I simply remember my favourite blogs and then I don’t feel so bad….Read more

Right Turn: The elements of a great story (courtesy of OIRM’s SciComms Workshop)

Author: Laine Jaremey, 12/16/16

I joined graduate students and early-career researchers at OIRM’s first Science Communications Workshop, held November 24, 2016 in Toronto. Expert communicators from a variety of backgrounds provided a valuable introduction to the essentials of successful science communication at the day-long event. We learned that storytelling is a tool that can help you to construct compelling…Read more

Understanding how to hone your story for media – Tips from an expert

Author: Laine Jaremey, 12/13/16

Last month, the Ontario Institute for Regenerative Medicine (OIRM) hosted its first Science Communications Workshop. Expert speakers, who included journalists, communicators and social media specialists, educated the mostly graduate students and early-career researchers in attendance by helping them navigate media interviews and communicate their work using social media. In this post, I’m sharing learnings from…Read more

Crazy for CRISPR!

Author: Sara M. Nolte, 12/05/16

On November 15th, my social media pages exploded with posts and comments regarding the latest news about how the gene-editing ‘CRISPR-Cas9’ technology had been used in the first human patient. The article, published by Nature, was entitled “CRISPR gene-editing tested in a person for the first time.” It described how a group of Chinese scientists…Read more

Right Turn: Every damn swan – a note on the scientific hypothesis

Author: Guest, 12/02/16

Malgosia Pakulska is a research associate in the Shoichet lab at the University of Toronto and a science writer for Research2Reality, a blog designed to engage the public in Canadian research. Malgosia wants to educate, entertain, and show people what science is really like, one story at a time. When she is not in the lab,…Read more

Right Turn: A proliferating list of popular podcasts

Author: Stacey Johnson, 11/25/16

Podcasts have been around since the 1980s and with 250,000 unique podcasts in more than 100 languages, according to Apple, you can probably find one that covers any topic you care to search for. Back in 2014, Lisa Willemse encouraged Signals’ readers to tune in to The Stem Cell Podcast and I mentioned them last…Read more