Posts Tagged ‘science’

Right Turn: Are your kids bored yet? Turn to these summer science distractions

Author: Stacey Johnson, 07/21/17

After 10 months of preparing lunches, doing homework, attending dance, hockey, piano lessons (or feel free to insert whatever else fits), the unstructured, lazy, hazy days of summer are a welcome relief. Until they aren’t anymore. If your little person or tween is in serious need of some distraction, here are some educational recommendations of…Read more

Right Turn: Colour your way to better health with regenerative medicine

Author: Laine Jaremey, 06/09/17

You may have heard of the adult colouring trend. In recent years, people have been reigniting their childhood passion of using markers, crayons and pencil crayons to “stay within the lines” while bringing colouring books and sheets to life. In response to this trend, a new industry of adult-oriented colouring books has emerged. These images…Read more

Right Turn: ‘Bad Project’ is good time waster that amuses millions

Author: Stacey Johnson, 05/12/17

It’s been quite a while since Signals has featured a parody video (here’s another one). But with students busy preparing year-end assignments, cramming for exams or finishing their theses, the time just feels right. (And even those of us in the workforce appreciate the occasional distraction.) The Zheng Lab at Baylor College of Medicine focuses…Read more

Right Turn: Lessons about science communications from a six-year-old podcaster

Author: Laine Jaremey, 04/28/17

What were you doing when you were six years old? When I was six, I was building forts with couch cushions and playing with toys. A six-year-old named Nate from Illinois, USA, achieves much more in his free time than I did when I was a child. Nate started his own podcast called “The Show…Read more

Right Turn: Best summer jobs for science students

Author: Stacey Johnson, 04/07/17

Remember back in 2013 when Tourism Australia launched the “Best jobs in the world” global youth campaign? Well, the Waag Society in Amsterdam may just have the “coolest science summer job” around! (Yes, Waag Society, you can quote me on this.) The Waag Society, an “institute for art, science and technology,” needs a science bus…Read more

Making a case for research investment in Canada: Can we drive reverse brain drain now?

Author: Camila Londono, 01/11/17

Brain drain was a real problem for Canada in the late ‘90s. A study by Statistics Canada found that twice as many post-secondary professors and teachers went to the United States than came to Canada in that period. This untenable situation—in which education and infrastructure investments in people were lost through decreased funding, higher taxes…Read more

Right Turn: Every damn swan – a note on the scientific hypothesis

Author: Guest, 12/02/16

Malgosia Pakulska is a research associate in the Shoichet lab at the University of Toronto and a science writer for Research2Reality, a blog designed to engage the public in Canadian research. Malgosia wants to educate, entertain, and show people what science is really like, one story at a time. When she is not in the lab,…Read more

Right Turn: What do the results of the U.S. election mean for science?

Author: Stacey Johnson, 11/09/16

This isn’t the blog that I planned to write this week, but I’m so preoccupied with the outcome of the U.S. election, I’m finding it hard to focus on anything else right now. So, let’s look at the implications of a Trump presidency on science. An article in Nature quotes Michael Lubell, director of public…Read more

Right Turn: Making science fun and relatable

Author: Stacey Johnson, 05/20/16

A popular marketing strategy is to reach (insert demographic) “where they live.” Science Genius appears to have taken that concept to heart when it comes to kids and science. Science Genius, launched in December 2012 by Christopher Emdin, the musician GZA and the website Rap Genius, began in New York City (NYC) to encourage teens…Read more

Right Turn: Resources for scientists

Author: Stacey Johnson, 05/13/16

I’ve read enough PhD Comics to understand that being a scientist is hard. (I work with them too, but I’m saving those stories for my tell-all autobiography.) Recently I stumbled upon* what I believe could be a useful resource for scientists to make their lives a little easier, and it made me wonder what other…Read more