Posts Tagged ‘stem cells’

Can we use animals as living incubators for human tissue?

Author: Jovana Drinjakovic, 01/16/17

Markus Grompe certainly thinks so and is working hard to make it happen. A scientist and a pediatrician specializing in inborn liver diseases, Dr. Grompe has a plan for overcoming the shortage of organ donors—the key obstacle for patients for whom the liver transplant is the only hope. Based at the Oregon Health and Science…Read more

Right Turn: A PhD in stand-up comedy

Author: Stacey Johnson, 01/06/17

“Biology is the only science in which multiplication is the same thing as division.” “Q: What did the conservative biologist say? A: The only cleavage I want to see is at the cellular level.” “Q: What did one cell say to his sister cell when she stepped on his toe? A. Mitosis”* Hunh? I’ve literally…Read more

Can we defy aging?

Author: Jovana Drinjakovic, 11/14/16

Last month, a paper published in Nature grabbed headlines by claiming that human lifespan is capped at 115 years. As disappointing as the news may be to anyone wanting to live forever, I’m okay with this shelf life, so long as I can be an energetic, pain-free supercentenarian. Still, despite tangible progress in medicine that…Read more

Right Turn: What do the results of the U.S. election mean for science?

Author: Stacey Johnson, 11/09/16

This isn’t the blog that I planned to write this week, but I’m so preoccupied with the outcome of the U.S. election, I’m finding it hard to focus on anything else right now. So, let’s look at the implications of a Trump presidency on science. An article in Nature quotes Michael Lubell, director of public…Read more

Ending on a high note – Day 3 of TMM2016

Author: Camila Londono, 10/31/16

Though the last day of the Till and McCulloch Meetings was a short one, it was absolutely fantastic. The day began with a thought-provoking talk by Douglas Sipp, from the Riken Center for Developmental Biology, touching upon the many issues surrounding regulation of stem cell therapies. I think as scientists, we often tend to forget…Read more

Lobbying for deregulation of stem cell procedures is giving rise to a new “dark economy”

Author: Hamideh Emrani, 10/31/16

Day 3 of the Till & McCulloch Meetings continued with many interesting talks. The one that I have chosen to write about in more detail Dr. Douglas Sipp’s, titled “The Stem Cell Dark Economy.” I think his talk was really thought provoking, and important to be shared with our readers. He began with an old…Read more

Stem cell regulatory networks, dynamics and ways to engineer them (Day 1, TMM2016)

Author: Hamideh Emrani, 10/25/16

This year’s Till & McCulloch Meetings (TMM2016) began with a diverse set of topics organized into three different plenary sessions. The first session, on regulatory networks in stem cells, began with Sara-Jane Dunn from Microsoft Research who introduced us to “The Reasoning Engine for Interaction Networks, RE:IN,” a computational tool that can synthesize and analyze…Read more

Right Turn: Dance your Ph.D. – give it a whirl!

Author: Stacey Johnson, 09/23/16

The “Dance Your Ph.D.” contest is a brilliant example of out of the box thinking, but it’s not the first case of science being interpreted through dance. Science journalist John Bohannon, the man behind “Dance Your Ph.D” – “an inebriated stunt at a Vienna science party” – says he did some research and found the first…Read more

The story of the first bone marrow transplant

Author: Jovana Drinjakovic, 09/15/16

It was a failed transplant that saved his life. In 1958, Radojko Maksic became the first person to receive a bone marrow graft from a stranger, after he was accidentally exposed to a lethal dose of radiation in Belgrade, in what was then Yugoslavia. He still lives in Belgrade, almost 60 years after the procedure….Read more

iPS cell technology – kickstarting our ability to control cell identity

Author: Holly Wobma, 08/25/16

When you hear the word “stem cell,” I imagine this conjures up the image of cells that are special. Unlike most cells, stem cells can differentiate into other cell types. They hold the promise of curing many diseases, and thus they are continually the source of hype in mainstream and social media. Yet the above…Read more