Posts Tagged ‘stem cells’

Right Turn: Are your kids bored yet? Turn to these summer science distractions

Author: Stacey Johnson, 07/21/17

After 10 months of preparing lunches, doing homework, attending dance, hockey, piano lessons (or feel free to insert whatever else fits), the unstructured, lazy, hazy days of summer are a welcome relief. Until they aren’t anymore. If your little person or tween is in serious need of some distraction, here are some educational recommendations of…Read more

Immune to cancer, long-lived and really ugly

Author: Jovana Drinjakovic, 06/27/17

They could well be the ugliest animals on the planet, but naked mole rats don’t get cancer or suffer decrepitude from old age. No wonder scientists are working hard to unlock the secrets of these bizarre-looking creatures that could teach us how to stave off disease and repair brains. With large protruding teeth, squinting useless…Read more

Right Turn: Colour your way to better health with regenerative medicine

Author: Laine Jaremey, 06/09/17

You may have heard of the adult colouring trend. In recent years, people have been reigniting their childhood passion of using markers, crayons and pencil crayons to “stay within the lines” while bringing colouring books and sheets to life. In response to this trend, a new industry of adult-oriented colouring books has emerged. These images…Read more

The curious case of applying electric shock to treat brain injuries

Author: Hamideh Emrani, 04/04/17

The month of March is a time for celebrating women around the world. As a science enthusiast, I have been so inspired by the women I see succeeding in the research field. Since I started writing for this blog, I have had the chance to write about and interview female researchers such as Jin Hyung…Read more

Right Turn: Stem cells, like children, are a labour of love

Author: Stacey Johnson, 03/17/17

For many Canadians with kids, we’re nearing the end of March Break – a holiday from school for elementary- and secondary school-aged children. Whether you’re travelling or at home this week, you’ve spent lots of quality time with your children and this new video from a group at Cambridge may really resonate with you. According…Read more

Peter Zandstra and CCRM: Making cell therapies a commercial reality

Author: Guest, 01/31/17

Dr. Rohin Iyer is currently a Development Manager at GE Healthcare / CCRM. He did his PhD in Biomedical Engineering at the University of Toronto, and has been working in the field of stem cells and tissue engineering for over 12 years. He is an avid tweeter (follow @DrRohinIyer) on cell therapies and regenerative medicine. …Read more

A peek at exciting research happening at the University of Toronto

Author: Stacey Johnson, 01/25/17

CCRM has been known to hire its graduates, consult with its esteemed professors, review disclosures from its faculty, collaborate on projects, and our Chief Scientific Officer, Dr. Peter Zandstra, is one of its respected professors. All of this to disclose that CCRM has very strong ties to the Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering (IBBME)…Read more

Can we use animals as living incubators for human tissue?

Author: Jovana Drinjakovic, 01/16/17

Markus Grompe certainly thinks so and is working hard to make it happen. A scientist and a pediatrician specializing in inborn liver diseases, Dr. Grompe has a plan for overcoming the shortage of organ donors—the key obstacle for patients for whom the liver transplant is the only hope. Based at the Oregon Health and Science…Read more

Right Turn: A PhD in stand-up comedy

Author: Stacey Johnson, 01/06/17

“Biology is the only science in which multiplication is the same thing as division.” “Q: What did the conservative biologist say? A: The only cleavage I want to see is at the cellular level.” “Q: What did one cell say to his sister cell when she stepped on his toe? A. Mitosis”* Hunh? I’ve literally…Read more

Can we defy aging?

Author: Jovana Drinjakovic, 11/14/16

Last month, a paper published in Nature grabbed headlines by claiming that human lifespan is capped at 115 years. As disappointing as the news may be to anyone wanting to live forever, I’m okay with this shelf life, so long as I can be an energetic, pain-free supercentenarian. Still, despite tangible progress in medicine that…Read more