Posts Tagged ‘video’

Right Turn: My question to Paul Knoepfler: Do you ever sleep?

Author: Stacey Johnson, 03/10/17

Paul Knoepfler, already well known for his prolific blogging at The Niche and for his role as a stem cell educator and tireless patient advocate – award winning no less – has taken on another project. Ask him a question about stem cells and you may get a live response. On February 26th, Dr. Knoepfler,…Read more

Right Turn: Synthetic biology predicted to become a huge industry

Author: Stacey Johnson, 02/10/17

There is a trend in the regenerative medicine field to include gene therapies when describing the work being performed by academics and industry, as in “cell and gene therapies.” The wider definition better reflects how the industry is evolving and acknowledges the dual focus. I expect the same may happen with synthetic biology’s role in…Read more

Right Turn: Valentine’s Day and the scientist

Author: Stacey Johnson, 02/03/17

The clock is ticking. Valentine’s Day is less than two weeks away. If you are flying solo this Valentine’s Day, I give you permission to stop reading here. (But it may be worth your while to stick around a little longer; remember the trend of single women buying diamond rings for themselves?) Valentine’s Day, despite…Read more

Right Turn: A PhD in stand-up comedy

Author: Stacey Johnson, 01/06/17

“Biology is the only science in which multiplication is the same thing as division.” “Q: What did the conservative biologist say? A: The only cleavage I want to see is at the cellular level.” “Q: What did one cell say to his sister cell when she stepped on his toe? A. Mitosis”* Hunh? I’ve literally…Read more

Crazy for CRISPR!

Author: Sara M. Nolte, 12/05/16

On November 15th, my social media pages exploded with posts and comments regarding the latest news about how the gene-editing ‘CRISPR-Cas9’ technology had been used in the first human patient. The article, published by Nature, was entitled “CRISPR gene-editing tested in a person for the first time.” It described how a group of Chinese scientists…Read more

Right Turn: Dance your Ph.D. – give it a whirl!

Author: Stacey Johnson, 09/23/16

The “Dance Your Ph.D.” contest is a brilliant example of out of the box thinking, but it’s not the first case of science being interpreted through dance. Science journalist John Bohannon, the man behind “Dance Your Ph.D” – “an inebriated stunt at a Vienna science party” – says he did some research and found the first…Read more

A complete (re)program to recognize the 10-year anniversary of iPSCs

Author: Stacey Johnson, 08/25/16

Ten years ago today, Japanese scientists Shinya Yamanaka and Kazutoshi Takahashi published a paper announcing the creation of rodent induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, thus pioneering the field of iPS cell technology. They showed that they could convert adult cells into pluripotent stem cells – in other words, they reprogrammed them to look and function…Read more

Right Turn: An art science exhibit on Drs. Till & McCulloch

Author: Stacey Johnson, 07/22/16

You would be hard-pressed to find a Canadian stem cell scientist who doesn’t know that Drs. Jim Till and Ernest McCulloch advanced medical research across the globe with their discovery, in 1961, of blood stem cells at Toronto’s Princess Margaret Hospital, today the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre. Recently, a group of artists, doctors, scientists and…Read more

Right Turn: Animals, ethics and Orwell

Author: Stacey Johnson, 07/08/16

Much has been said on the topic of using animals for medical/scientific research. There are excellent and compelling arguments for and against the issue and my plan is to avoid taking a stand here. (You may be tempted to call me chicken, but that would be a really bad pun!) As polarizing as this topic…Read more

Right Turn: Resources for scientists

Author: Stacey Johnson, 05/13/16

I’ve read enough PhD Comics to understand that being a scientist is hard. (I work with them too, but I’m saving those stories for my tell-all autobiography.) Recently I stumbled upon* what I believe could be a useful resource for scientists to make their lives a little easier, and it made me wonder what other…Read more