Archive for the ‘Tissue engineering’ Category

Can we use animals as living incubators for human tissue?

Author: Jovana Drinjakovic, 01/16/17

Markus Grompe certainly thinks so and is working hard to make it happen. A scientist and a pediatrician specializing in inborn liver diseases, Dr. Grompe has a plan for overcoming the shortage of organ donors—the key obstacle for patients for whom the liver transplant is the only hope. Based at the Oregon Health and Science…Read more

Can we defy aging?

Author: Jovana Drinjakovic, 11/14/16

Last month, a paper published in Nature grabbed headlines by claiming that human lifespan is capped at 115 years. As disappointing as the news may be to anyone wanting to live forever, I’m okay with this shelf life, so long as I can be an energetic, pain-free supercentenarian. Still, despite tangible progress in medicine that…Read more

Would you buy a designer bag made from lab-grown human skin?

Author: Jovana Drinjakovic, 10/06/16

In case you haven’t heard, Tina Gorjanc, a UK-based fashion designer, shocked the fashion world this summer when she announced her Pure Human collection of luxury leather items, to be made from lab-grown human skin, engineered with the late designer Alexander McQueen’s DNA. I know, it makes your brain twist in on itself! As you…Read more

Biomaterials and the “ouch” factor in Olympics and sports

Author: Hamideh Emrani, 09/07/16

Other than multiple heat waves, this summer has been all about sports and the excitement of different tournaments. The Europe 2016 soccer league, the 2016 Olympics in Brazil and last but not least on my list is my sons’ soccer endeavors. I am a fan of soccer and as the mother of two young soccer…Read more

Each vessel is special: Engineering kidney-specific microvasculature

Author: Holly Wobma, 08/29/16

As humans, it is natural to categorize our environment. Usually, these groups include perceptible differences. -The red shirt vs. the blue shirt (not the near infrared vs. far infrared shirt) -The quiet (to our ears) sound vs. the loud sound -etc. Since we don’t readily see or feel microscopic differences in our body, for most…Read more

The stem cell therapy’s obstacle course

Author: Jovana Drinjakovic, 08/25/16

Science fiction became real life in September 2014, when a team of eye surgeons in Japan transplanted a body part, grown entirely in a dish, into the eye of a patient suffering from an eye disease. The retinal graft came from the patient’s skin cells, raising hopes that one day our own bodies could be…Read more

Right Turn: Andrew Pelling Redux

Author: Stacey Johnson, 08/12/16

August 10, 2016 | UOttawa professor and TED Fellow is the keynote speaker for the 2016 Undergraduate Summer Research Program (USRP) Symposium. Here’s what our community members had to say on social media:

Right Turn: Rock star in a Petri dish

Author: Alanna Evans, 07/15/16

You could say Guy Ben-Ary is a rock-n-roll Renaissance man. In his 9-to-5 life, he’s manager of CellCentral, Australia’s first integrated histology and biological imaging lab. And in the hours that remain, he’s an artist drawing inspiration from his day job. Most recently, his scientific and creative pursuits were put to the test when he…Read more

Highlights from the World Biomaterials Congress Part II: Stepping up delivery strategies

Author: Samantha Payne, 06/20/16

This post is the second of two covering the World Biomaterials Congress. To read my previous blog about the use of biomaterials to study cell behaviour and differentiation in vitro, please click here. This post will cover the use of biomaterials for in vivo delivery strategies. Cartilage, despite its essential role in the movement of…Read more