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Holly Wobma

Holly is an MD-PhD student at Columbia University in New York. She recently (2011) completed a Bachelor of Health Sciences Honours Degree from the University of Calgary, where she pursued research related to nanotechnology and regenerative medicine. In addition to research, she enjoys participating in science outreach roles. Previously, she contributed to an award-winning Nanoscience animation produced by the Science Alberta Foundation (“Do You Know What Nano Means?”), and served on the board of directors for the Canadian Institute for Photonic Innovations Student Network. Holly's lab tweets @GVNlab.

Posts by: Holly


Relay race to finish off inflammatory cells

I don’t have many distinct memories from childhood. Certainly not of global events. But given the sweltering weather, the recent Canada 150 celebration, and a cool new paper published in Cell Chemical Biology, my mind wandered back to the ’96 summer Olympics (Atlanta), when Donovan Bailey raced through the finish line with his arms in […]

What time zone is your heart tissue In?

Our lives our governed by our concept of time. Whether you are relatively spontaneous or a micromanager of your daily schedule, how we coordinate our work and interactions with other people comes down to the 24-hour clock we picture in our minds. Of course, this 24-hour clock is more than just a social construct. It […]

Filling the void: A scientist’s introduction to commercialization/clinical translation

For anybody who has invested a great deal of time into a research project, you probably feel a certain sense of expertise on the topic. Sure, it is impossible to know a whole field (every answer raises more questions), and lab work is rife with puzzlement and failures, but at the end of the day, […]

From organ survival to organ revival – how patients can regenerate their own donor lung prior to surgery

For most areas of medicine, the supply of a treatment can easily meet demand (access issues aside). Need an antibody? A steroid? Millions of pills are manufactured every day. The case could not be more different for solid organ transplantation, for which the list of patients with end-stage organ failure vastly exceeds the number of […]

Sculpted to a T: Synthetic T-cells for a more controlled immune response

I have a confession.  This is not a blog about stem cells. It is, however, a blog about cells with infinite possibilities of fate. Because we are entering the world of synthetic biology, where crafty cellular engineering has enabled a new level of control over immune cell function. This work comes out of Wendell Lim’s […]