Signals Blog
Menu

Samantha Payne

Samantha is a PhD student in the Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry department at the University of Toronto. She has previously investigated regeneration in a non-mammalian gecko model during an MSc program, and now currently combines stem cell biology and biomaterials to encapsulate and deliver therapeutic cells to the stroke-injured brain. Samantha became interested in scientific communication as a means to combine her love of writing and science to share exciting scientific discoveries to a broader community. Follow Samantha on Twitter @samantha_lpayne

Posts by: Samantha


Adapting the language of computers for regenerative medicine

In many regenerative medicine strategies, we know that one strategy is usually not enough. Stimulating regeneration in any tissue is a complex, multifaceted problem involving the coordination of many biological signals. Yet what if we could deliver a therapeutic, like a drug or cells, to the body in such a precisely controlled manner that we […]

Building a bridge for brain repair

The brain is one of the most complex and delicate organs of the body, with very little capacity to regenerate itself. As such, any disease or injury it sustains is a challenge for regenerative medicine researchers to design effective strategies. Therapeutics need to be minimally invasive so the brain is not damaged further, and they […]

The roots of regeneration

The study of how organisms evolved and diversified, called phylogeny (phylo = race or kind and gene = origin), may bring up memories of sitting in biology class looking at elaborate tree-shaped diagrams and incomprehensible latin labels. But there is so much more to it. If we take a closer look, it becomes clear that phylogenetics can be […]

Why do stroke regenerative therapies fail to reach the clinic?

The author of the popular Seven Habits of Highly Effective People book, Steven R. Covery, said “strength lies in differences, not in similarities.” While this may be helpful advice for improving your personal life, researchers are learning that differences in preclinical studies are weakening the ability to translate effective therapies to the clinic. While one […]

Wave of the future: Using anesthesia to detect neurodegeneration

Most people have experienced being put to sleep for a surgical procedure, whether it is relatively minor like the removal of a tooth, or major heart surgery. In fact, every day 60 000 people will undergo general anesthesia in the U.S. You may have noticed a lot of stories sound similar: “I was completely awake […]